Carbon as a building material

Carbon fibres are high-strength fibres with a diameter of about 5-10 micrometres and comprised of about 97% carbon atoms. Bundled and processed into technical textiles, they are then embedded together with stabilising foams into an epoxy resin and cured under pressure and temperature. The resulting sandwich composite has a number of advantages over traditional materials:

Icon high strength and rigidity
high strength and rigidity
Icon low weight
low weight
Icon high chemical resistance
high chemical resistance
Icon high temperature resistance
high temperature resistance
Icon low thermal expansion
low thermal expansion
Icon a nearly unlimited life expectancy
a nearly unlimited life expectancy
Icon high energy absorption in extreme situations
high energy absorption in extreme situations
Icon good repair features
good repair features

These properties have made carbon very popular in aviation and aerospace, construction, motorsports and other high-end applications such as boatbuilding. Even the monocoque and other parts of Formula 1 race cars are manufactured out of carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic.

SAY uses reliable standard fibres from classes T300 and T700 with individual layer weights between 200 and 800 grams.

SAY – expertise in carbon

The man behind SAY GmbH and at the head of the boatyard is Karl Wagner, one of the most experienced carbon specialists in Europe. Before joining SAY, Wagner and his 700 employees at the company Carbo Tech were one of the largest producers of carbon-fibre-reinforced components for the automobile industry. Carbo Tech also manufactured components for Formula 1 and monocoques for race cars and super sports cars.

It is with this expertise that Wagner raised the quality standards and engineering at SAY to levels seen in the automotive world and optimised production with strict design plans, parts lists and work procedures. The result is an exceptionally well-trained staff who deliver boats with quality that is second to none anywhere in the world.

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